Investment Objectives

The Fund aims to achieve long-term capital growth by investing in a diversified portfolio of collective investment schemes.

The Investment Manager (“We”) will invest in collective investment schemes (“CIS”) (including UCITS, exchange-traded funds and other collective investment undertakings) that invest in a broad range of assets, including debt and equity securities. In instances, this may involve investing in CISs that are managed by the Investment Manager.

The Investment Manager (“We”) aims to build a diversified portfolio spread across several industries and sectors.

The Fund is actively managed, not managed by reference to any index.

Investor Profile

A typical investor in the CC Growth Strategy Fund is:

  • Seeking to achieve long-term capital appreciation
  • Seeking an actively managed & diversified investment in equity funds and bond funds
  • Planning to hold their investment for at least 5 years 

Fund Rules

  1. The fund may invest up to 40% of its assets in CISs that are permitted to invest 65% or more of their assets in money market instruments.
  2. The fund may invest up to 30% of its assets in CISs that are permitted to invest 65% or more of their assets in investment-grade bonds.
  3. The fund may invest up to 50% of its assets in CISs that are permitted to invest 65% or more of their assets in high yield bonds.
  4. The fund may invest up to 100% of its assets in CISs that are permitted to invest 65% or more of their assets in equity securities.

Commentary

April 2022

Introduction

April was a month of reckoning for markets. Expectations as regards FED’s commitment about tackling inflation have been more than validated as inflation crept up to levels probably unimaginable a year ago. What was debatable in February, as a possible course of action in terms of interest rate hikes by year end, has been now actioned by the FED effectively shifting upwards market expectations regarding future FOMC meetings. This sent bond yields sharply up and stocks firmly down ending the debate as to whether we are in market correction or an outright bear market. Financial markets aside, the economic growth concerns are compounding the unsettling effects of inflation. In Europe, economic growth is endangered by the effects of the prolonging war in Ukraine. In China, economic growth is questioned by zero-covid policy lockdowns in Shanghai and Beijing areas and feeble leading macro indicators. In other emerging markets, economic growth is trampled by rocketing energy prices and a surging US dollar. And in the US, although the employment numbers are still positive, there are growing concerns that more interest rate hikes might eventually push the economy into recession. The stagflation scenario feared not a long time ago now paints to a very bleak forecast for this year. 

From the monetary front, the FED is seen more and more as having done a very serious mistakes last year when framing inflation as “transitory” and now feeling the need of playing catch up with this phenomenon at any cost. And even in Europe the initial perplexity from an ECB conditioned by a weak economic recovery to doing nothing has begun to make way for expectations of raising interest rates this year to fight inflation. In contrast, in China weak economic numbers have commanded fresh stimuli from monetary authorities as the economic growth target set by Communist authorities for this year is in serious doubt.

In the month of April equity markets have lost all the gains from last month. Only the very defensive sectors like consumer staples and utilities have withstand the market rout, as clearly investors are abandoning the growth stories built on high market multiples and valuing more real cash flows and proven earnings power. Although all in all the earnings season was positive, there is a real concern that consumer spending will look weaker in the quarters ahead and current earnings expectations are overstated. Caution is still the name of the game in equity markets.

Market Environment and Performance

The Eurozone economy advanced by 0.2 per cent in the first quarter of 2022, the least since the bloc exited recession last year. Business activity in the Euro economic area painted a mixed picture as services benefitted from loosened coronavirus restrictions, while manufacturing contracted. As such, the Eurozone Composite Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) increased to 55.8 in April from the previous month reading of 54.9.  

In April, energy and food prices continued to contribute to a rise in annual inflation, leading to a fresh record high in Eurozone inflation of 7.5 per cent, in line with expectations. Core inflation, which excludes transitory or temporary price volatility, rose to 3.5 per cent – the highest reading since available record began in January 1997. The rate inflation remains well above the European Central bank (ECB) target of 2.0 per cent. Month-on-month, inflation increased by 0.6 per cent.

The US economy unexpectedly contracted by an annualized 1.4 per cent in the first quarter of 2022, against expectations of 1.1 per cent expansion. Aggregate business activity in the US continued to signal an expansion in April across the private sector. US Services PMI revised slightly higher to 55.6 from a preliminary of 54.7, came in lower than the previous month’s reading of 58. Meanwhile, manufacturing PMI headed higher to 59.2 from 58.8 in March, pointing to the strongest growth in factory activity in seven months.

Annual inflation rate in the U.S. slowed to 8.3 per cent in April, from 8.5 per cent in the previous month, yet exceeding market expectations of 8.1 per cent. The reading marked the 14th consecutive month that inflation is above the FED’s 2 per cent target as energy costs weigh. Similarly, core inflation, which excludes transitory or temporary price volatility, slowed to 6.2 per cent from 6.5 per cent a month earlier.

Equity markets had an awful performance in April as inflationary worries and consequent monetary tightening expectations have come to the fore. While such theme has been common across developed markets, US markets have underperformed compared to their European peers as the latter have already seen significant erosion year-to-date on growing concerns regarding their economic backdrop going forward into the year. Meanwhile emerging markets have seen further travails form the economic slowdown in China. The S&P 500 index fell by 4.19% as the FED’s hawkish stance on inflation has hammered cyclical sectors still trading at high multiples. In Europe, the EuroStoxx50 and the DAX lost 2.50% and 2. 02% respectively, mainly on a deteriorating macroeconomic perspective in the Eurozone.

Fund Performance

Performance for the month of April proved negative for the CC Growth Portfolio Fund, a loss of 4.72 per cent. The fund continued to gradually tap the market following a period in which cash was consciously maintained in order to potentially take advantage from any market weakness. Indeed, April continued to present the perfect opportunity for long-term investors to tap the market.

Market and Investment Outlook

Going forward, the Manager sees the macroeconomic backdrop deteriorating particularly in Europe as inflationary pressures start pinching disposable income. In the US the peak inflation debate might actually prove to be irrelevant in the coming months as the FED could be already committed to a certain course of action. In addition, a protracted period with oil prices at current levels might be sufficient to cause a global recession, if the already heightened level in government yields globally will not do the job instead. From a financial markets perspective, yield levels make bonds more and more appealing as an asset class when compared to stocks for the first time in the last decade. In terms of portfolio management, these are arguments for keeping the defensive positioning taken since the beginning of the year. The very challenging environment in terms of equity returns commands higher than usual cash levels and a more momentum-based tactical positioning than fundamental conviction over the long term. In the current market environment there are more emotions than reason which market participants seem to be interpreting.

A quick introduction to our Global High Income Bond Fund

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Key Facts & Performance

Fund Manager

Jordan Portelli

Jordan is an Investment Manager at Calamatta Cuschieri and is the Head of the Fixed Income desk. Jordan has over 10 years’ experience in High Yield debt. He is a member on a number of Investment Committees and is also a member on the House View Committee of Calamatta Cuschieri. He obtained a Diploma in Business and Management from Cambridge College in the U.K. He also obtained his BSc (Hons) in Economics from the London School of Economics.

PRICE (EUR)

ASSET CLASS

Mixed

MIN. INITIAL INVESTMENT

€5000

FUND TYPE

UCITS

BASE CURRENCY

EUR

RETURN (SINCE INCEPTION)*

-11.39%

*View Performance History below
Inception Date: 03 Nov 2021
ISIN: MT7000030672
Bloomberg Ticker: CCPGSCA MV
Entry Charge: up to 2.50%
Total Expense Ratio: 2.44%
Exit Charge: None
Distribution Yield (%):
Underlying Yield (%):
Distribution: Nil
Total Net Assets: €4.23 mn
Month end NAV in EUR: 88.61
Number of Holdings: 18
Auditors: Deloitte Malta
Legal Advisor: GANADO Advocates
Custodian: Sparkasse Bank Malta p.l.c.
% of Top 10 Holdings: 67.8

Performance To Date (EUR)

Top 10 Holdings

CC Funds SICAV plc - Euro High Yield
9.5%
UBS Lux Bond Fund - Euro High Yield Shares
8.4%
Fundsmith SICAV - Equity Fund
8.3%
Invesco Pan European Equity Fund
7.5%
Comgest Growth plc - Europe Opportunities
6.8%
UBS Lux Equity Fund - European Shares
5.8%
Legg Mason Global Funds plc
5.7%
Morgan Stanley Investment Fund
5.5%
Robeco BP US Large Cap Equities
5.4%
Vontobel Fund - US Equity Shares
4.9%
Data for major sector breakdown is not available for this fund.
Data for maturity buckets is not available for this fund.
Data for credit ratings is not available for this fund.

Risk & Reward Profile

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Lower Risk

Potentialy Lower Reward

Higher Risk

Potentialy Higher Reward

Top Holdings by Country

European Region
28.60%
U.S.
20.30%
International
19.80%
Global
14.20%
China
3.00%

Asset Allocation

Fund 84.90%
Cash 14.10%
ETF 1.00%

Performance History (EUR)*

YTD

-11.03%

2021

-0.41%

1-month

-4.72%

3-month

-5.90%

6-month

-4.76%

Annualised Since Inception

-%

* The Accumulator Share Class (Class A) was launched on 3 November 2021
** Returns quoted net of TER. Entry and exit charges may reduce returns for investors.

Currency Allocation

Euro 94.60%
USD 5.40%
GBP 0.0%
Data for risk statistics is not available for this fund.

Interested in this product?

  • Investment Objectives

    The Fund aims to achieve long-term capital growth by investing in a diversified portfolio of collective investment schemes.

    The Investment Manager (“We”) will invest in collective investment schemes (“CIS”) (including UCITS, exchange-traded funds and other collective investment undertakings) that invest in a broad range of assets, including debt and equity securities. In instances, this may involve investing in CISs that are managed by the Investment Manager.

    The Investment Manager (“We”) aims to build a diversified portfolio spread across several industries and sectors.

    The Fund is actively managed, not managed by reference to any index.

  • Investor profile

    A typical investor in the CC Growth Strategy Fund is:

    • Seeking to achieve long-term capital appreciation
    • Seeking an actively managed & diversified investment in equity funds and bond funds
    • Planning to hold their investment for at least 5 years 
    Investor Profile Icon
  • Fund Rules

    The Investment Manager of the CC High Income Bond Funds – EUR and USD has the duty to ensure that the underlying investments of the funds are well diversified. According to the prospectus, the investment manager has to abide by a number of investment restrictions to safeguard the value of the assets

  • Commentary

    April 2022

    Introduction

    April was a month of reckoning for markets. Expectations as regards FED’s commitment about tackling inflation have been more than validated as inflation crept up to levels probably unimaginable a year ago. What was debatable in February, as a possible course of action in terms of interest rate hikes by year end, has been now actioned by the FED effectively shifting upwards market expectations regarding future FOMC meetings. This sent bond yields sharply up and stocks firmly down ending the debate as to whether we are in market correction or an outright bear market. Financial markets aside, the economic growth concerns are compounding the unsettling effects of inflation. In Europe, economic growth is endangered by the effects of the prolonging war in Ukraine. In China, economic growth is questioned by zero-covid policy lockdowns in Shanghai and Beijing areas and feeble leading macro indicators. In other emerging markets, economic growth is trampled by rocketing energy prices and a surging US dollar. And in the US, although the employment numbers are still positive, there are growing concerns that more interest rate hikes might eventually push the economy into recession. The stagflation scenario feared not a long time ago now paints to a very bleak forecast for this year. 

    From the monetary front, the FED is seen more and more as having done a very serious mistakes last year when framing inflation as “transitory” and now feeling the need of playing catch up with this phenomenon at any cost. And even in Europe the initial perplexity from an ECB conditioned by a weak economic recovery to doing nothing has begun to make way for expectations of raising interest rates this year to fight inflation. In contrast, in China weak economic numbers have commanded fresh stimuli from monetary authorities as the economic growth target set by Communist authorities for this year is in serious doubt.

    In the month of April equity markets have lost all the gains from last month. Only the very defensive sectors like consumer staples and utilities have withstand the market rout, as clearly investors are abandoning the growth stories built on high market multiples and valuing more real cash flows and proven earnings power. Although all in all the earnings season was positive, there is a real concern that consumer spending will look weaker in the quarters ahead and current earnings expectations are overstated. Caution is still the name of the game in equity markets.

    Market Environment and Performance

    The Eurozone economy advanced by 0.2 per cent in the first quarter of 2022, the least since the bloc exited recession last year. Business activity in the Euro economic area painted a mixed picture as services benefitted from loosened coronavirus restrictions, while manufacturing contracted. As such, the Eurozone Composite Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) increased to 55.8 in April from the previous month reading of 54.9.  

    In April, energy and food prices continued to contribute to a rise in annual inflation, leading to a fresh record high in Eurozone inflation of 7.5 per cent, in line with expectations. Core inflation, which excludes transitory or temporary price volatility, rose to 3.5 per cent – the highest reading since available record began in January 1997. The rate inflation remains well above the European Central bank (ECB) target of 2.0 per cent. Month-on-month, inflation increased by 0.6 per cent.

    The US economy unexpectedly contracted by an annualized 1.4 per cent in the first quarter of 2022, against expectations of 1.1 per cent expansion. Aggregate business activity in the US continued to signal an expansion in April across the private sector. US Services PMI revised slightly higher to 55.6 from a preliminary of 54.7, came in lower than the previous month’s reading of 58. Meanwhile, manufacturing PMI headed higher to 59.2 from 58.8 in March, pointing to the strongest growth in factory activity in seven months.

    Annual inflation rate in the U.S. slowed to 8.3 per cent in April, from 8.5 per cent in the previous month, yet exceeding market expectations of 8.1 per cent. The reading marked the 14th consecutive month that inflation is above the FED’s 2 per cent target as energy costs weigh. Similarly, core inflation, which excludes transitory or temporary price volatility, slowed to 6.2 per cent from 6.5 per cent a month earlier.

    Equity markets had an awful performance in April as inflationary worries and consequent monetary tightening expectations have come to the fore. While such theme has been common across developed markets, US markets have underperformed compared to their European peers as the latter have already seen significant erosion year-to-date on growing concerns regarding their economic backdrop going forward into the year. Meanwhile emerging markets have seen further travails form the economic slowdown in China. The S&P 500 index fell by 4.19% as the FED’s hawkish stance on inflation has hammered cyclical sectors still trading at high multiples. In Europe, the EuroStoxx50 and the DAX lost 2.50% and 2. 02% respectively, mainly on a deteriorating macroeconomic perspective in the Eurozone.

    Fund Performance

    Performance for the month of April proved negative for the CC Growth Portfolio Fund, a loss of 4.72 per cent. The fund continued to gradually tap the market following a period in which cash was consciously maintained in order to potentially take advantage from any market weakness. Indeed, April continued to present the perfect opportunity for long-term investors to tap the market.

    Market and Investment Outlook

    Going forward, the Manager sees the macroeconomic backdrop deteriorating particularly in Europe as inflationary pressures start pinching disposable income. In the US the peak inflation debate might actually prove to be irrelevant in the coming months as the FED could be already committed to a certain course of action. In addition, a protracted period with oil prices at current levels might be sufficient to cause a global recession, if the already heightened level in government yields globally will not do the job instead. From a financial markets perspective, yield levels make bonds more and more appealing as an asset class when compared to stocks for the first time in the last decade. In terms of portfolio management, these are arguments for keeping the defensive positioning taken since the beginning of the year. The very challenging environment in terms of equity returns commands higher than usual cash levels and a more momentum-based tactical positioning than fundamental conviction over the long term. In the current market environment there are more emotions than reason which market participants seem to be interpreting.

  • Key facts & performance

    Fund Manager

    Jordan Portelli

    Jordan is an Investment Manager at Calamatta Cuschieri and is the Head of the Fixed Income desk. Jordan has over 10 years’ experience in High Yield debt. He is a member on a number of Investment Committees and is also a member on the House View Committee of Calamatta Cuschieri. He obtained a Diploma in Business and Management from Cambridge College in the U.K. He also obtained his BSc (Hons) in Economics from the London School of Economics.

    PRICE (EUR)

    ASSET CLASS

    Mixed

    MIN. INITIAL INVESTMENT

    €5000

    FUND TYPE

    UCITS

    BASE CURRENCY

    EUR

    RETURN (SINCE INCEPTION)*

    -11.39%

    *View Performance History below
    Inception Date: 03 Nov 2021
    ISIN: MT7000030672
    Bloomberg Ticker: CCPGSCA MV
    Entry Charge: up to 2.50%
    Total Expense Ratio: 2.44%
    Exit Charge: None
    Distribution Yield (%):
    Underlying Yield (%):
    Distribution: Nil
    Total Net Assets: €4.23 mn
    Month end NAV in EUR: 88.61
    Number of Holdings: 18
    Auditors: Deloitte Malta
    Legal Advisor: GANADO Advocates
    Custodian: Sparkasse Bank Malta p.l.c.
    % of Top 10 Holdings: 67.8

    Performance To Date (EUR)

    Risk & Reward Profile

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    Lower Risk

    Potentialy Lower Reward

    Higher Risk

    Potentialy Higher Reward

    Top 10 Holdings

    CC Funds SICAV plc - Euro High Yield
    9.5%
    UBS Lux Bond Fund - Euro High Yield Shares
    8.4%
    Fundsmith SICAV - Equity Fund
    8.3%
    Invesco Pan European Equity Fund
    7.5%
    Comgest Growth plc - Europe Opportunities
    6.8%
    UBS Lux Equity Fund - European Shares
    5.8%
    Legg Mason Global Funds plc
    5.7%
    Morgan Stanley Investment Fund
    5.5%
    Robeco BP US Large Cap Equities
    5.4%
    Vontobel Fund - US Equity Shares
    4.9%

    Top Holdings by Country

    European Region
    28.60%
    U.S.
    20.30%
    International
    19.80%
    Global
    14.20%
    China
    3.00%

    Asset Allocation

    Fund 84.90%
    Cash 14.10%
    ETF 1.00%

    Performance History (EUR)*

    YTD

    -11.03%

    2021

    -0.41%

    1-month

    -4.72%

    3-month

    -5.90%

    6-month

    -4.76%

    Annualised Since Inception

    -%

    * The Accumulator Share Class (Class A) was launched on 3 November 2021
    ** Returns quoted net of TER. Entry and exit charges may reduce returns for investors.

    Currency Allocation

    Euro 94.60%
    USD 5.40%
    GBP 0.0%
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